Document Type : ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE

Authors

1 Department of Forest Resources Management, College of Forestry and Environmental Science, Central Mindanao University, Musuan, Maramag, Bukidnon, Philippines

2 Department of Environmental Science, College of Forestry and Environmental Science, Central Mindanao University, Musuan, Maramag, Bukidnon, Philippines

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Fine topographic information is a key input parameter for a detailed flood simulation and mapping. This study aimed to compare the accuracy statistics of the flood models developed using the digital elevation datasets with different resolutions from the light detection and ranging and interferometric synthetic aperture radar systems.
METHODS: The study applied the Hydrologic Engineering Center-Hydrologic Modeling System and Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System models workable within the geographic information system to simulate and map flood hazards in Maapag Watershed. The models’ validity and accuracy were tested using the confusion error matrix, f-measurement, and the root means square error statistics.
FINDINGS: Results show that using the light detection and ranging dataset, the model is accurate at 88%, 0.61, and 0.41; while using the interferometric synthetic aperture radar dataset, the model is accurate at 76%, 0.34, 0.53; for the error matrix, f-measurement, and root mean square error; respectively.
CONCLUSION: The model developed using the light detection and ranging dataset showed higher accuracy than the model developed using the interferometric synthetic aperture radar. Nevertheless, the latter can be used for flood simulation and mapping as an alternative to the former considering the cost of model implementation and the smaller degree of accuracy residual error. Hence, flood modelers particularly from local authorities prefer to use coarser datasets to optimize the budget for flood simulation and mapping undertakings.

Graphical Abstract

Flood hazard simulation and mapping using digital elevation models with different resolutions

Highlights

  • LiDAR DEM provides more detailed and precise flood hazard maps than IfSAR DEM with minimal residual errors;
  • IfSAR DEM can be used for flood simulation and mapping as an alternative to LiDAR DEM with statistically acceptable outputs;
  • Flood simulation and mapping using high-resolution digital elevation model datasets allow generating vital information essential in creating a sound policy instrument for more improved and cost-effective implementation of flood ha zards monitoring and management.

Keywords

Main Subjects

Open Access

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Publisher’s Note

GJESM Publisher remains neutral concerning jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional afflictions.

Citation Metrics & Captures

Google Scholar Scopus Web of Science PlumX Metrics Altmetrics Mendeley |

Current Publisher

GJESM Publisher

Letters to Editor

GJESM Journal welcomes letters to the editor for the post-publication discussions and corrections which allows debate post publication on its site, through the Letters to Editor. Letters pertaining to manuscript published in GJESM should be sent to the editorial office of GJESM within three months of either online publication or before printed publication, except for critiques of original research. Following points are to be considering before sending the letters (comments) to the editor.

[1] Letters that include statements of statistics, facts, research, or theories should include appropriate references, although more than three are discouraged.
[2] Letters that are personal attacks on an author rather than thoughtful criticism of the author’s ideas will not be considered for publication.
[3] Letters can be no more than 300 words in length.
[4] Letter writers should include a statement at the beginning of the letter stating that it is being submitted either for publication or not.
[5] Anonymous letters will not be considered.
[6] Letter writers must include their city and state of residence or work.
[7] Letters will be edited for clarity and length.

CAPTCHA Image